Warwick ThorntonWarwick Thornton
Cinematographer/Director

Warwick Thornton is an award-winning Indigenous director, screenwriter and cinematographer.

Born and raised in Alice Springs he spent his teens working at CAAMA radio station before perfecting his trade as a cinematographer at AFTRS film school in Sydney for three years.

Warwick’s quickly established a strong presence in the industry creating a series of short films, focusing on contemporary Indigenous stories. Both Nana and Greenbush were selected and premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival. Establishing Warwick as an important voice in Australian cinema.

Following the success of these films Warwick began work on Samson and Delilah a confronting look at the relationship between two young Aboriginal teenagers in Alice Springs. The film premiered at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival in 2009, winning the Golden Camera for Warwick. Samson and Delilah collecting numerous awards including winning best film at the AFI awards, Asia Pacific Screen awards and the Film Critics Circle awards.

The success of Samson and Delilah opened doors and allowed Warwick to begin work on his next feature The Darkside, a film which presents well know Australian actors such as Debra Mailman retelling Indigenous ghost stories, and was Warwick third film invited to premiere at the 2013 Berlin International Film Festival. Most recently he directed and shot the opening segment of Tim Winton’s The Turning.

Warwick has also created dynamic television work, his series Art + Soul focused on presenting an insiders view of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and artists. The series created a deeper understanding for the spiritual and cultural significance Indigenous art still has in twenty-first century Australia.

In 2012 he was the cinematographer on the hit film from director Wayne Blair The Sapphires once again highlighting Warwick’s ability to present diverse and exciting Indigenous stories.

Warwick has also created dynamic television work, his series Art + Soul focused on presenting an insiders view of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and artists. The series created a deeper understanding for the spiritual and cultural significance Indigenous art still has in twenty-first century Australia.

Although Warwick has solidified a name for himself as director and screenwriter he is also widely regarded for his work as a cinematographer. Beginning his career as DOP on films such as 1998’s Radiance and the critically successful SBS documentary series First Australians. In 2012 he was the cinematographer on the hit film from director Wayne Blair The Sapphires once again highlighting Warwick’s ability to present diverse and exciting Indigenous stories.